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En Común receives funding for second season of programing from Hollywood Foreign Press Association

We’re thrilled to announce that InquireFirst has received funding for a second season of En Común: conocimiento en voz viva, our radio program on science, health and environment tailored for Indigenous communities in Latin America.

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is providing funding that has made it possible for En Común to broadcast 20 weekly, science-based reports on health and environmental issues that affect Indigenous communities in Latin America that form a multicultural mosaic of diverse ethnic identities, ancestral knowledge and cultural values.

 En Común shares the voices of Indigenous people as our reporters – many of them Indigenous journalists working for the first time with an international media organization – record the concerns and the experiences of people in their communities. In our Mosaico de Voces segment, we give voice to those who are often not heard.

In Amecameca in the state of México, “the transmission of the programs produced by En Común has allowed us to approach science, health and environment issues from a plain perspective,” said Veronica Galicia Castro, general director of La Voladora Radio.

“This type of project promotes dialogue among members of the communities, it proposes actions that will benefit the community and it challenges people to understand science as an extension of community-building,” Galicia Castro said.

Our program is unique. 

Led by co-founder and executive producer Iván Carrillo in collaboration with InquireFirst Executive Director Lynne Walker, En Común is directed by experienced journalists who are focused on science, health and the environment.

Many of our reports are conducted by indigenous journalists who understand the needs and concerns of their communities and have well-developed sources.  Additionally, all of our programming is in Spanish.

To reach an international audience, we are collaborating with Massachusetts-based Cultural Survival, which is sharing our program with more than 1,650 affiliated radio stations serving indigenous audiences through its Indigenous Rights Radio programming.

We also formed an alliance with the Instituto Mexicano de la Radio (IMER) that allows us to reach community radio stations stretching from Chiapas at Mexico’s southern border to Baja California at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Juan Carlos Reyes Torres, director of radio broadcasters at IMER, said En Común “reaches its audiences with relevant topics on health, science and caring for the environment” and “offers examples of the sound work done by indigenous, rural and urban communities in Mexico.”

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